Investors with Vision; Oxymoron?

I recently found myself engaged in heated debates with a few of my friends and acquaintances about Angel Investors (the real and the wannabe), Venture Capitalists, Incubators, Bankers, etc.

One of the things said, which resonated with me, was the following: “An Angel Investor or VC is looking for companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google. Basically superstars.”

But if we look at most investors in the market, we would find NONE of them would have the vision to fund Google when they were getting started. Sergey and Larry even went to Yahoo, who reviewed the company and declined to purchase it or invest in it. Now ask yourself this: If Yahoo (who supposedly “understood” the Internet and were a major player) failed to see the vision in Google’s product, why should an Angel Investor? Or even worse, a VC? (who is really more like a banker).

Indeed – Sergey and Larry had to work hard and against all odds, to get their search engine up and running and make it useful for internet users. And what they created changed search engines forever, changing the perception and meaning of search, and big data along with it all. It was true innovation, and at the time it was introduced, NO INVESTOR UNDERSTOOD IT. Remember this when you start working on your idea.

I feel I need to expand a bit on what it means that they “did not understand it”. Sure, they saw the product demo, they heard the pitch, but they were unable to project the impact of the technology they saw on the market. The ability to look at a market and say, wow, this really changes everything, is a combination of skill and art reserved to a handful of people. In other words, don’t assume that Angel Investors have this magical ability to see into the future of your company, and understand whether or not it will succeed.

UPDATE: I found this report today by the awesome guys at CB Insights: Top NY Seed Investors ranked by Follow-on Investment Rate and while I am not saying you should ignore investors who are not on that list, I do strongly recommend you take a look at the ones on this list first. As a small company, you need to be even more careful how you spend your time.

Investors: Basically sheep, with strong herd instincts

“Fear is the path of the dark side…” — Yoda

The problem here is fear. Here is a list of problems caused by fear:

  1. Investors who invest in “packs” or a “herd”, look for a leader. You will quickly recognize them; you’ll be presenting to a room full of “investors” (sometimes ~30 people!). If there is no leader, this diminishes the chances of investment by many orders of magnitude (to basically none).
  2. Modern investors no longer invest with their hearts, they try to invest with their “brains” instead (which in theory should be a good thing, and while many of them are pretty smart, it takes time to really look into a technology, do a proper due diligence, and make an informed decision). So instead of performing a proper analysis, they look for something to make them feel “comfortable” that there will be an adequate ROI (Return On Investment). They no longer “connect” with the venture’s “spirit”, something that might give them the needed courage to make a leap of faith.
  3. VC’s are really more like bankers. Why? Because they are not investing their own money. They fear failure above anything else. When you invest your own money, and you make sure it’s money that you wouldn’t cry over it if you lost it, you tend to have way more courage with your money, and you put your money where your mouth is, without fear.

Now, Bankers operate according to the most basic fear principles: What if you are unable to repay your debt? What if this, what if that? This is why unless you can offer some assurances, banks will usually not lend you money. If you own a house, a banker will agree to use your house as security, and will give you a loan up to X% of the house’s value (taking into account depreciation, costs of handling, etc). Needless to say, the whole thing will be insured from here to the moon. All due to fear, and the need to perform. Or rather, the fear of not performing. We all know what happens to men who have performance anxiety: Impotence.

Mathematical formula to magically convert an investor into a sheep:

Anxiety Performance + Investor = Sheep (baaaaaaa!)

A fun exercise!

I decided to test this theory. The idea was to find a company that became extremely successful, improve on its products, but address the same market with a more or less similar technology. In other words, innovate enough to be different, but be similar enough to be able to replicate the same success.

The problem was that Facebook, Google and Twitter were started, and have succeeded in the US. I had to import something that the US had not seen yet, but that I knew the US needed. I chose the QIWI model. I added some innovative ingredients into the formula: Bitcoin currency support (sell Bitcoins, and accept Bitcoins for products), and a QR Code Scanner which doubles as a document scanner for KYC (the US is a heavily regulated business environment, and I knew better than to leave this feature out of the Kiosk).

QIWI is a highly successful, publicly traded company, but it is almost unknown in the US. It has nearly 200,000 cash payment kiosks in Russia, Ukraine, and a few other countries. I don’t think many people realize what a great company QIWI is, and how awesome its impact on humanity is.

I spent a year developing the technology as a hobby, and a few months ago I presented it at Ultralight Startups, and surprise surprise, it took second place in the startup competition. This earned me the “privilege” of being considered for investment by New York Angels.

To make a long story short, I presented the company, showed that the product works, explained that I already signed important agreements and explained that i’m about to deploy several machines in the market. Guess what? They didn’t get it. And they declined to invest. Their concern? That I won’t be able to sell it…

And now, just to prove them wrong, I am going to actually deploy this Kiosk in the US market, and it is going to work. Why? There are many reasons for this, one of them is of course my tenacity and determination. But also because America has at least 25% unbanked population (this morning at Finovate I heard a much more pessimistic figure, claiming that after 2008, almost 50% of the population is now living month to month, with very little access to advanced financial tools). And finally, because this model has been proven to work, and it will work. I will then also take it to North Africa, and other African countries in West Africa.

I found out that there are credit unions working very hard to address this population with innovative products. There’s even a foundation called The Ford Foundation, which invests money in innovative products that serve the un-banked and the under-banked. I’m also seeing huge excitement when I tell people I managed to build it so cheap, that I will be able to sell it at a street price of $2500. This is unheard of in the world of self-service Kiosks of this class and quality, and the people who live and work in this market know this, and respect it.

Anyway, Wish me luck! 🙂


Hitting the big 40

So. Here we are! tomorrow (or tonight, around 2pm IST, if you count based on my exact birth date and hour) I turn 40. I’m still alive, and kicking.

I once thought that by the time I turn 40, I will surely have at least 2 children. But after some setbacks I’m now well on my way to becoming a father, ETA November 11 (which coincidentally is exactly one year since the marriage ceremony took place).

I also thought that by the time I turn 40, my hair will go entirely gray. Instead, it is still 99% black. I think that’s a good sign.

I used to like being alone on my birthday. I used to take the day off (if it wasn’t a weekend), and just walk around aimlessly, meditating on the year past, thinking about the strange events that brought me so far. This year, I am happy to say, I do not want to be alone. I prefer to spend tomorrow with my wife, doing something relaxed and fun.

And on the 31st, we’re having a combination of Baby Shower, Birthday Celebration, and House warming. We’ll entertain guests in our house, make all kinds of delicious finger foods, play some chill music and offer drinks. Maybe a champagne will be opened. Who knows.

Anyway, Here’s to hitting 40. One part of me didn’t think I’d make it (that’s the part that expects i’ll be hit by a garbage truck any day now). Another part of me thinks I’ll live to 100. Both parts are grateful to be alive 😉

A stack for the apocalypse

Or Afristack, as I call it. I was approached by a wonderful person recently who wants to end death from hunger. What I liked in his approach, besides the fact that it mirrors my own philosophies about helping neglected communities, is that it does not give handouts to the poor. Instead it educates them on a path to a form of mini-capitalism.

For a person like me, who loves distributed projects, financial engines, gamification, and mass deployments, this sounds like an awesome beast to design and play with.

The idea is to create self-healing, self-establishing smart network infrastructure in remote areas, and provide some basic services to those remote communities, such as:

  • Tracking the progress of people, the courses they took, their health (mental and physical), their income and assets, their trends (personal and social), and more.
  • Messaging services, both real-time and non-real time. Chat and Email for example. Except servers should queue messages and hold them even if there’s no internet connectivity. In other words, mail should be MX’d by regional nodes, until they obtain internet connectivity, to deliver to real mail servers.
  • Wallet services. This services allows people to run local economies, and track their currencies and assets. It should also allow them to pay each other, but in a decentralized manner. Think Bitcoin.
  • Alerts, News, etc. for example the ability to detect outbreaks (malaria and the likes), dangerous weather phenomena, low water reservoirs or bad water quality that could endanger lives. And on the other hand, generate news that those remote communities might find useful, such as weather reports, general news, weddings, new regulations, and anything else of interest.
  • General access to the internet, but especially to resources such as Wikipedia, Khan Academy, and so on. The regional and local server nodes should cache as much as possible, so as not to tax the internet gateways at the edges of the mesh.
  • Eventually, add more services, such as package tracking and routing, to allow some sort of “post office” to exist, complete with reputation systems for participants, and a reward system based on speed of delivery and quality of service.

So after much thinking (24 hours), I came up with the following software stack and approach. Tell me what you think about my choices:

  • Node.JS as a lightweight application server
  • Meteor.JS + Angular.JS for web apps
  • MongoDB for data storage and replication
  • Byzantium for mesh networking (takes care of DNS and Routing)
  • ZeroMQ for fast, efficient messaging between mesh nodes
  • Squid or Nginx for web proxying
  • node-rules as a lightweight rule engine, to automate as much as possible based on generated events that flow, and are captured, over ZeroMQ.
  • Open-Transactions to issue currencies, and manage cryptographic wallets


When is a business plan needed?

I saw this question today on a forum in LinkedIn and decided to write this quick post, about when exactly a business plan is needed.

One of the participants in the discussion even suggested that VC’s should be more trusting of entrepreneurs, which caused me to scoff and cough. Anyway, here’s how the world really works: Nobody trusts anybody. People don’t even trust themselves. We are all human beings. Human beings invented the atomic bomb, and human beings orchestrated the holocaust. So nobody should trust you that your idea just works – that just makes no sense.

If you have a great idea, one you think will revolutionize some thing or other, you need to first create a working prototype. This is the ultimate proof that you can actually make something happen, and not just talk about, or write a word document about. If you create a working prototype it means so many things: You have the team. You have the skills. You have the motivation. You validated your concept. You invested your own time and money into your vision, instead of waiting for someone to shower you with money.

What if creating a prototype costs way more money than you have? That’s where investment is needed. And that’s also where you’ll need a business plan. But you need to realize that a business plan is something that will change many, many times over the course of a company’s life. Below, I detail to some degree, how that business plan changes, as you progress in the investment/stage ladder.

And it goes in this order of precedence:

You are the first investor: Do you have a day job? Don’t hurry to quit your day job. Maybe you can move to a cheaper apartment, maybe that will mean you can divert some of your salary to building your product. You are your best investor. And you should become your own devil’s advocate, and ask yourself: Would I invest in myself? And this is where your first business plan comes. This is a simple spreadsheet. Put your costs, and put the costs of your product, put the market size, and try to include the element of time. Nothing happens overnight. Just creating this first spreadsheet will be very revealing even to yourself. And you should ask yourself difficult questions: Will people pay X for Y? How much % of the market will actually purchase?

Friends and Family: You’d be surprised and enlightened, when trying to pitch the idea to your friends and family. How fast will they get it? Will they shoot you down? Will they have other great ideas to contribute to you, for free? An idea is great, but presenting it to someone other than yourself is an enlightening experience. You can trust your family, and sometimes you can trust your close friends. Maybe some of them will help you with money. I’ve seen it happen, so don’t rule it out. This is where your business plan will probably change again, and improve. It needs to look simple for your friends and family. Is it overly complex? Chances are your friends and family are not going to be the only ones who will lose interest in your spreadsheet.

Crowd funding: This new investment channel is revolutionary in itself. If your product appeals to consumers, you can sell it before it even exists. Isn’t this extraordinary? Many projects are now starting their way in crowd funding. One of those projects that is close to my heart is the Oculus Rift. Here’s an absolutely perfect example of a product that no VC would ever fund. And worse! The world of VR was considered worse than dead. Why do I say worse? Because there have been several attempts at VR, all have failed miserably. But here comes a guy with a vision (Palmer Luckey), and a promise to make it happen. And guess what, I now have a Rift and I can testify it works, and Palmer delivered on his promise. Not only that, but due the wild success of his campaign, game companies joined in the effort, and many games are now adapting their software to work with the Rift. And with all this incredible success, Oculus can now raise money from VC’s and bring the product to the masses. But even here, you need a business plan. Why? Because if you promise a product for $300, but spend $500 building it, you will not be able to supply this product to all the customers who ordered it, and you fail miserably. A business plan is ALWAYS needed, even a simple one that makes sure you are at least in the green.

Angel Investors: And I am talking about REAL angel investors here, not VC/Bankers who are masquerading as Angels. An Angel investor loses money if you go bust, and you are not expected to return any “loans”. It is more like receiving a Grant. You receive it based on trust, that you can make it happen, and that your idea is worth trying. The Angel investor should sit down with you, one on one. Do not fall for the trap of meeting “flocks”. Insist on meeting one on one, and if that angel wants to bring more people in on the investment, let him do the work of convincing additional angel investors into joining. If they have questions, they will ask him, and he will ask you in turn. And this is where a good Angel Investor who has experience, will help you revise your business plan again. They will ask for more details, and help you structure your business plan, and make it look more professional. In some cases, if they put money into your idea, some of that money will go to a professional business plan analyst who will make your business plan look like a tasty cake.

The banks: Sometimes banks are seen in a negative light, but I avoid falling into that trap. Same thing with VC’s, but more about that in the next section. So banks are in a position to give you a business loan. Depending on your relationship with the bank, you could get a loan with more, or less, favorable interest rates. And yet, they do not expect a x5 ~ x20 times return on investment. They only expect the money back with interest, and you can usually refinance and spread it over a period of time. If you have reached the prototype stage, and spoken to a few customers and realized they want to buy it or lease it, and you have orders, say 200 orders for a device that cost $200 to make, and sells for $400. You need $40,000 which the bank will usually give you quite easily. You then sell your customers the device for that 100% profit, give the bank their 3% ~ 12% and you are still left with 80%+ of the margin, and no VC meddled into your business, or replaced you with his brother in law CEO, just because you failed to produce a x20 time ROI. This is where your business plan might change again, you need to show your bank that there is a very high chance that you are making your money back. This should boost their confidence in you and your business, and increases your chances of getting the business loan.

Finally, Venture Capitalists: Those guys are last in the list, and for good reason. A VC usually sits on a pretty large amount of cash. Say $100M to $500M, many times more (I’m not going to talk about Micro-VC’s, they are a slightly different creature). The VC’s goal is to make at least x5 ~ x10 ROI. To achieve this fantastic ROI, they need companies that are at a very mature stage, selling an existing product to existing markets. In other words, a company that has already proven its business model and is on the verge of international success, but now needs more money in order to replicate that success. The VC then invests the money required to reach those new markets, to produce more products that will sell to those untapped consumer markets, to advertise the product to more people, to raise brand awareness, to hire more teams to produce the product faster, and so on. So primarily, their investment is focused on maximum ROI, always, forever. They do not need or want to trust you, and they do not need to have a vision – they only need to focus on ROI. That is their job, and don’t take it personally. This is why their due diligence is a long, painful process. To get to this point, you must have a very mature business plan, where all the numbers are REAL numbers (data collected in the field); You know how many people bought the product, you know how much it cost to produce, you know your own costs (burn rate, production costs, advertising costs), you know everything there is to know about your business!


Apple lets Ive design iOS 7? Is Jony Ive really that good?

What can I say – Personally I thought the iPhone 3G was the peak in quality of iPhone design by Apple. For me, the iPhone 4 and 5 were a huge step back. Sadly, the durability of the device was sacrificed for a futuristic look, despite making the phone impractical and super fragile. At least with the iPhone 5 the back side of the phone is no longer made of glass (what a silly, silly idea!), but it’s still made of aluminium, which again, scratches and bends out of shape quite easily, making the phone look ugly pretty quickly. I wouldn’t mind the black iPhone 5 for example, but I know that soon enough, the scratches on the black edges will expose the aluminium underneath, and make the phone really ugly.

I also thought the Unibody Macbook Pro really sucked when it first came out. The aluminium body is easily scratched, dented, and once bent it is impossible to bend it back into shape. Plus, my model is the one with the really sharp edges, notorious for the “slit wrists” effect (this was fixed in later models, but no apology was issued to those of us who still own the knife-sharp models). Jony then repeated the same horrible mistake with the iPad. My iPad fell on a soft rug a couple of weeks ago, from a distance of only 30cm, and it still got its edges dented and bent (but thankfully the glass did not break). 6 month ago, one of the rubber “legs” on my Unibody Macbook Pro cracked and fell off. I went to the Apple store and discovered they do not sell the plastic leg, but instead replace the entire bottom panel of the laptop. I was shocked. Thankfully I have Apple Care, and it was replaced free of charge, but seriously Apple?! To make things worse, the first MBP Unibody I have (which died and was resurrected) still has black holes to the left of the trackpad, where my left hand rests. Those holes were caused by, surprise surprise, my wedding band! It turns out that when I was using my laptop bare footed, with my feet touching the floor (meaning I was grounded, electrically speaking), micro-sparks would occur between my wedding band and the aluminium casing. Those sparks eventually made deep, visible holes in the casing! I thought at first that it was dirt and I tried to clean it. However a closer look revealed actual holes. It is impossible to fix.

Jony Ive: Those products are used in the real world. They are not sitting in a museum inside a thick glass box. Sure, they looks pretty, but they are not practical. Want to make it practical? why don’t you make future Apple devices using carbon fiber?

I’m sorry but I think Aluminium is an extremely poor choice for the outer shells of electronic devices. Plastic for the iPad would have been so much better! Carbon Fiber even more so. The plastic that was used for the iPhone 3G was fantastic – it was shiny, hard, durable and it looked great. The iPhone 3G also felt way better in my hand. Nobody is going to convince me that carving into aluminium is better than producing a high quality plastic mould. There are enough companies out there producing really beautiful laptops, that are way more durable than Apple’s.

So now Jony Ive is doing iOS 7 User Interface Design? I really hope this is not going to be a “New Coke” moment for Apple. In any case, we are about to find out (In 2 days, to be exact).

Venture Capitalists Hijack “Angel Investor” Term?

I read an article today about some “Angel” group in New York City, and I realized something horrible is happening. It seems VC’s are trying to disguise themselves as Angel Investors. Maybe to attract more startups? Maybe to appear less frightening? Maybe to shed the negative “aura” attached to VC’s?

It used to be that Angel investors gave small amounts of money to startups, not because they were looking to make an “Exit”. The meetings were one-on-one, it was personal, it was friendly warm and humane. The Angel investor remembered himself being in the Entrepreneur’s shoes, and was not afraid to say things that were perhaps not very politically correct. When you’re doing a one-on-one, that works fine, but when you’re in a group, you will most likely remain politically correct, and refrain from giving the kind of advice you’d give in a one-on-one session.

So when I read that article about how that group of “Angel Investors” operates, it sounded to me more like a group of Bankers or VC’s, than a group of Angels. I was quite annoyed to say the least. While I have no problem presenting my company to a crowd, when it comes to an investment meeting, I do not believe elevator speeches or 15 minute presentations are the right tool to present to Angel investors (or in fact to any investor).

How it’s actually supposed to work

I believe in two people meeting and taking a deep dive into the core of the startup being presented. One is the Entrepreneur, who may be seeing his own startup for the first time being reflected from the perspective of the Angel investor (an eye opening experience, to some!), and the second is the Angel investor, who has the challenge and responsibility of getting into the Entrepreneur’s mind.

I do not believe in a murder of crows (bunch of VC’s sitting in a room, with a lone entrepreneur presenting to them). This is not “American Idol”. It is criminally presumptuous to think that you can judge a startup from one short presentation. It’s also sad to think that a startup might get filtered out because the entrepreneur fumbled some of the answers. Not everybody was born a Steve Jobs, and even Steve Jobs was not born Steve Jobs. He was shaped and hardened by his life and experiences, over a very long period of time. An entrepreneur is not there to entertain with a magical presentation that came out of a unicorn ass hopping happily on a rainbow.

Any veteran partner of any business will tell you – A partnership is like marriage. And like in most good marriages, you will find people who nurture each other, allow each other to grow, allow each other to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes, not judge each other so harshly all the time, etc.

So yes – I believe in one on one sessions, where even if the entrepreneur is rejected by the angel investor, at least he came out of it with tons of personal advice; he came out of it smarter. Maybe the angel investor also learned something. Maybe he learned something he would never have learned, about that person standing in front of him, if he were in a room full of other angel investors. Something that might have changed his mind, and made him into a fan and a believer, rather than a minute-judge.

Angels can’t possible know everything, right? After all, while many of them succeeded because of personal sacrifices and some very hard work, some of it was also pure luck, being in the right place in the right time, and knowing the right people – How many people know the right people? Despite the world being small, not too many.

So be humble, be humane, be respecting of yourself and others, regardless of how many silly ideas were/are presented to you. You are dealing with people, and while money is important, so is the journey. Do you feel a bit “burnt”? Do the right thing and take a short (or long) vacation from investing, just whatever you do, don’t vent your accumulated frustrations on entrepreneurs.

So am I doomed as an entrepreneur?

No. I believe the good old Angel Investors still exist, and are out there somewhere. You just need to steer clear from the rotten ones. When you consider meeting with an angel investor, check the following list:

  • Was it easy to get a meeting with the angel investor? or did they do you a favor and gave you a meeting some 30 ~ 50 days from today? Bonus points if you managed to talk to the Angel Investor directly, and did not have to go through bureaucracy or secretaries.
  • Are they investing on their own, or in “packs of wolves”? I recommend you avoid “panels” with 3 or more investors. If an Angel investor is incapable of deciding on his own whether or not he likes your idea, you don’t want him or his money.
  • Are you expected to prepare a detailed business plan? show traction? That’s not angel investment, that’s venture capital. Stay away from those clowns looking to make money on your exit, and find a real Angel Investor.
  • Is the investor constantly late, difficult to reach, canceling/postponing meetings, and is generally flaky? You should ask yourself if you really want to do business with a disorganized entity. Especially as you take your first steps setting up your venture, you can not afford wasting time on cancelled meetings and flakiness.
  • Are they behaving like assholes, trying to lump sum your ideas into a narrow category, and completely missing the point? Telling you there is already a company like yours out there? (Google was not the first search engine, Yahoo was not the first news portal, and Skype was not the first VoIP app!). Are they just plain being rude? Get out of there and don’t come back. And warn your friends.
  • Is the Angel Investor knowledgable? Are they asking you smart questions? Do they understand your answers, or are they foggy at best? The best investors, are investors who understand your venture on a deep level. They may even become your fans and followers, if your idea really touched them. That’s the kind of Angel Investor you want, and should strive to find.


How a Juicing diet works (+recipes)

My own background story with Juicing

This story begins before I left Israel, around October 2009. I was working comfortably in the hi-tech industry, eating regular meals every day with my colleagues. The sad truth is that I somehow let myself go, and eventually weighed around 105kg (that’s almost 210 pounds for those on the imperial system). For a person who used to being very slim and athletic, it was a horrible shock to look at a photo of myself one day, and realizing what I have done to myself without noticing.

Fast forward to the winter of 2010. I was living in Russia with two flat mates (It was cheaper to rent a room than to rent an apartment, plus I was lonely at the time and I figured I could use the company).

The two women in the apartment used a steamer to cook their foods. I remembered my mom using a steamer, way back in my childhood, but it was only used rarely, for some very specific types of food; definitely not as the main cooking apparatus.

Moscow is notoriously expensive, and since I was trying to save money, buying meat was reserved for special occasions. I basically bought a lot of Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Onions, Beet, Corn, and a LOT of Buckwheat (As the Russians call it: “Grétchka”). And so, for a period of 3 months this is mostly what I ate. This, and the occasional whole wheat Subway sandwich with imitation crab meat and tons of vegetables. Needless to say, I did not drink sugary drinks, and instead drank water with lemon juice.

Old dog learns new tricks

About 1.5 years ago, my friend Golan Ben-Oni introduced me to Dr. Fuhrman, the book “Eat To Live” (which has since made it to the New York Times’ best selling book in the “self help” category), to the China Study, and to Dr. Novick, the funny and witty nutritionist with the warm, charming smile and the always-awesome presentations. He also told me about the movie “Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead” by Joe Cross (which has since become a sensation). That movie, along with the rich information provided by the nutritionists I mentioned, has really opened my eyes about nutrition.

In the space of a few months, I realized what I had been doing wrong my entire life, and why when I was eating only vegetables and raw grain back in Russia, I was losing weight fast, and feeling extremely healthy. In fact it almost got scary to see myself losing so much weight so quickly – I lost 20kg in 3 month.

And yet, it’s one thing to know what to do, and to actually do it. Just like many smokers know smoking kills and causes cancer, but never actually quit smoking. But what if they actually got cancer, suffered through treatment, died, and were suddenly given another chance to jump back in time to the moment they started smoking? How many of them would actually decide to never start smoking?

I feel that what happened to me by chance, has inadvertently shown me two things: 1) It is actually possible to go back to your BMI, and in just a few months. 2) The feeling of being healthy and looking great again, is totally worth the effort.

So can an old dog learn new tricks, and change his ways? Well, mostly. I don’t believe in going to the extreme – I think you sometimes need to have your comfort foods, so that you feel you aren’t completely giving up on your old lifestyle. A slice of Pizza every 2 ~ 3 months? That’s totally acceptable to me.

The basic idea behind juicing

The idea here is that our bodies no longer get the nutrition they need, because we eat a relatively very narrow diet. A study of bones found from before and after the agricultural revolution clearly shows that before the agricultural revolution, people were taller, healthier, and better fed, compared to people who lived after the agricultural revolution.

The simple explanation is that before the agricultural revolution, we were “hunters / gatherers” which meant that we relied on a large variety of foods (whatever we could find that day). After the agricultural revolution, we started eating only one or two types of grain, instead of 50. What this essentially means is that we significantly narrowed our spectrum of nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Suddenly our bodies were not getting all the minerals and vitamins they were used to getting.

The same problem exists with dietary supplements. Rates of cancer have actually gone up since dietary supplements were introduced. The simple truth is that you can’t replace a tomato, which has hundreds of types of vitamins and minerals, with a pill that contains just vitamins A, B and C. Our nutrition is more than just those 3 vitamins. We actually do need those hundreds of vitamins and minerals that a Fresh tomato has, and no pill can give us those nutrients, no matter how good it is.

So why juice? Why not just eat vegetables and fruits?

You could certainly just eat vegetables and fruits, but when you are trying to recover and heal your body, either from some trauma, chronic disease, malnutrition, diabetes, or major weight gain, and you are out of time (literally), you have to take drastic measures. Once you get to the point where you are healthy again, then you can move to “maintenance mode”, and you can start juicing just once a week, of course while eating a balanced diet consisting of vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts and seeds, leafy greens, berries, etc.

How does juicing work? What’s special about juicing?

In order to heal, your body needs to rebuild its reserves of vitamins and minerals. The problem is that if you tried to obtain the amounts you actually need, you would have to consume 5 whole leafs of kale, 5 stalks of celery, 1 beet, 1 bunch of spinach, 5 large carrots, 2 apples, 2 tomatoes, 1 lemon, and repeat all this 3 times a day.

Thing is, you can’t possibly eat all of that in a day, simply because of the large volume of space this food would require in your stomach. To overcome this limitation, we juice those vegetables and fruits. Luckily, modern juicers separate the juice (containing all the good stuff) from the pulp (which is just empty cellulose). By getting rid of the cellulose, you get a juice that contains all the vitamins and minerals from all those vegetables and fruits that you can drink easily.


The “Everything” Juice

  • One bunch of Kale (Around 8 ~ 10 leafs)
  • Two carrots
  • Two small beets or one large beet
  • Two celery stalks
  • One Green Apple
  • One Red Apple
  • Ginger (5 slices)

Just Green

  • One bunch of Kale (Around 8 ~ 10 leafs)
  • One bunch Spinach
  • Two celery stalks
  • Two Green Apples

And here are some external links: